Tag Archives: The Best of All Possible Worlds

Realistic vs. Romantic Literature

Hello my readers, time again for me to touch on a series of posts I’ve written over the course of the blog so far. It all started out from a definition of science fiction I read in a book, which led into a blog post exploring that. Then, for comparison, I explored a definition of fantasy based on a quote that’s floated around social media. So between the two, I had pitted Frank Herbert against J.R.R. Tolkien. Then, for another look at it, I compared Star Trek and Star Wars. I still really like my genre exploration there.

And then I listened to George R.R. Martin on the Nerdist Podcast, and it got me thinking that all this work of putting things in genres, and holding one over another or pitting them against one another, was wrong; and I was working on coming up with new terms or new ways of thinking about the differences, of trying to really articulate what I was trying to say.

That’s when I got a comment back on that first post, questioning what I meant about science fiction, making me really think about what I was saying. The commenter – who had the opportunity to interview the author, Paolo Bacigalupi – recommended and discussed The Windup Girl. So I felt I needed to read that first and consider it. And to consider what it is I have been trying to articulate, to think of the terms and groupings and ways that we talk about these sorts of stories, and so that is where I am coming from with this post. Let me know in the comments what you think!

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The Best of All Possible Worlds, Part 2

The other day, I introduced the question: if you could live in another time or place, would you? And where? Including, and perhaps especially, fictional worlds. I included a poll, so you, the readers, could consider and give input on the question as well. You can check out that post here.

Clockwork Angels AlbumI take the title, The Best of All Possible Worlds, from Clockwork Angels by Rush. In the novel – and by extension the album, I suppose – the goal of the Utopian project is to build the best of all possible worlds. In this, one of many possible worlds. I did a post about reading the novel here.

In other words, I have been building to this point for a while. Indeed, really, with my whole series on Science Fiction and Religion. Because to me, the whole purpose of these posts, this sort of thought, is that Science Fiction touches in some of the most important ways on Religion – exploring its future, exploring the things which might disprove it, exploring people who keep their faith even as humanity (or other species) expand out into the stars.

So join me as I consider the question just a bit further: Which is the best of all possible worlds?

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The Best of All Possible Worlds, Part 1

There are so many great fictional worlds out there – ones deep and rich, ones that capture our imagination. Ones we “geek out” over, cosplay in, role play in. The love of immersive video games is the love of escaping to a fictional world, is escapism from where we are here and now.

Of course, many worlds we create are best left to fiction. Just so with the dystopias, the falling worlds. I’m just fine not living in Westeros, thank you. The show actually enhances this thought. But even so, are there better worlds we’ve imagined, better worlds than ours?

This is not rhetorical, but is instead indeed my question for today. Especially with reading Clockwork Angels, I’ve been thinking about this question. So I thought I would ask you, with some of my thoughts on the more… Hospitable fictional worlds. Or maybe just fan favorites?

I have more thoughts on the topic, but I’ve decided that’s the stuff for another post, so expect that next week. For now, give it some thought, and give it some votes. Which one of these fictional worlds would you like to live in? Or do you like it here? Vote and comment away!

In This One of Many Possible Worlds – A Review of Clockwork Angels

I recently finished reading Clockwork Angels, written by Kevin J. Anderson, based on lyrics by Neil Peart of Rush. I first saw this book sitting on the shelf about a year and a half ago, and was excited to find both that Rush had a new album out, and that someone had finally written a book based on some of the excellent mythologies and stories Rush has produced.

So I listened to the album for quite a while before reading the book finally, which is maybe how it should work with this. With a solid backing in the music – which is, as I understand it, the first total-album concept album by Rush – I then turned to the book. I had some preconceptions, based on the album, based on Rush and their Libertarian leanings, and maybe based a bit on what I was expecting to write about it in the blog once we reached the point where that was a thing.

I see there’s a concert album coming out next month – going to have to get that! They released one of the songs, so let me share that with you:

There will be spoilers to come about this book, but then, it’s based on an album, so in some ways, spoilers were the name of the game. However, if you never planned on reading this anyway, definitely read on to see what they created by combining these two artforms! Especially if you like what you hear in the concert video!

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