Tag Archives: Teens React

Do you expect the things you say and do online will be seen by the people you’re talking about?

Long title, but it’s a bit of a complex idea… when you review or talk about someone and their work online, do you expect it to be seen? Say, like in this video?

Teens react to Linkin Park reacts to Teen React to Linkin Park!

The Fine Brothers have a few times now had the subjects of their React videos watch the React video… taking it next level to getting those original reactors to watch the reaction is just so meta.

But there’s also the attitude that the teens really never expected anything they said to be heard by Linkin Park. And really, that seems reasonable. There’s so many people saying so many things online, every day. Being found by interested readers or viewers is hard – think of every YouTube video you’ve ever seen where they ask you to like and subscribe to their channel. You’ve found them, and they don’t want to lose you.

Being noticed by the people you’re reviewing? It’s rare.

We’ve had it happen at times, with our site. Elliott Morgan did. Focus Features shared our review of The World’s End, that was cool. But other things we’ve done that seemed like they should get notice – say, using a hashtag – end up going unnoticed. You just never know.

So I get it – the teens thinking they could speak without the thought that they would be seen by the subject. Not just in this case, but really, all of the reactors in all of the react videos. Every once in a while, they’ll ask them a question like “if you could talk directly to” the subject of the video. But still, without the thought that they would actually see it.

Let me turn the question around to you, dear readers: when you’re putting your thoughts and opinions out online, do you do so thinking that the subject of your comments will see them? That your positive reviews might elicit joy in them? Your negative ones elicit defensiveness? In your social media, in your blog posts, in your YouTube videos and all the rest. What do you think?

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Console Seller, Indeed: Zelda, Breath of the Wild

No, we haven’t bought a Nintendo Switch yet. Though we have discussed doing so. Perhaps in the hope of not making ourselves too excited for a game we otherwise would not be able to play, we haven’t looked up gameplay videos, or even trailers – though we’ve seen things indirectly, through looking up the Nintendo Switch itself. Having the new Zelda title as a release game seems like a good plan, and having it be a really really good Zelda game would of course help. Which seems to be what’s happened…

I mean, we watch most of the React Channel videos, so when we saw it was Zelda: Breath of the Wild, I pushed for us to watch it. Dang it! That game looks absolutely great! The idea that this is a console-selling game looks to be completely valid, especially when you add in the potential for other interesting and good games down the line.

Something we had not at all realized until watching this video: this game is far more of an RPG, or JRPG, than previous Zelda titles have been. Watching Link collect clothing items, weapons off of defeated enemies, things like that – they’re all strong elements of the RPG video game, but not necessarily of past Zelda games. This both fascinated us and made us want the game a bit more, I think.

Do you have Breath of the Wild yet? Is this game making you strongly consider a Nintendo Switch? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Try not to smile or laugh – allow us to steal some of your time!

So one of the occasional features on the Fine Bros Entertainment YouTube channel that we liked was when they showed them videos and told them to try not to smile or laugh. Whoever made it through all the videos was a winner. Some of the clips they show make it really hard, with looping fails or slow motion.

React Channel logoWith their newer channel, just called React, they have turned this into a far more frequent thing, up to 24 episodes now where all it is is these challenges. It also opened it up to being not just one group (Teens, Elders, Kids, Adults, YouTubers…) doing the challenge, but instead a mix.

I just looked and saw we haven’t really mentioned this on the blog, even though we watch all of these when they’re posted! Often the videos themselves we can resist laughing at, but the reactors – when they laugh, and then catch themselves laughing and realize they’re out – we end up laughing at or with. In other words, we’re not very good at this at all.

So here’s the playlist, currently 24 challenges. Enjoy!

Try not to smile or laugh – allow us to steal some of your time!

So one of the occasional features on the Fine Bros Entertainment YouTube channel that we liked was when they showed them videos and told them to try not to smile or laugh. Whoever made it through all the videos was a winner. Some of the clips they show make it really hard, with looping fails or slow motion.

React Channel logo

With their newer channel, just called React, they have turned this into a far more frequent thing, up to 24 episodes now where all it is is these challenges. It also opened it up to being not just one group (Teens, Elders, Kids, Adults, YouTubers…) doing the challenge, but instead a mix.

I just looked and saw we haven’t really mentioned this on the blog, even though we watch all of these when they’re posted! Often the videos themselves we can resist laughing at, but the reactors – when they laugh, and then catch themselves laughing and realize they’re out – we end up laughing at or with. In other words, we’re not very good at this at all.

So here’s the playlist, currently 24 challenges. Enjoy!

Teens Show Grasp of Problematic Representations

So the recent episode of react videos from the Fine Bros actually brings up a really interesting topic. The video is Teens React to Blurred Lines, where they have teens watching the PG version of the Robin Thicke Blurred Lines music video. First off I have to be grateful because I have neither heard the song or seen the music video. I had heard about it slightly, but just did not care enough to watch it myself. After watching the watching of the video I am even more happy to say that I never watched it myself.

The most interesting thing that happens during the video is when the teens really examine the video and what it means about the song, many of them are a bit taken back. Many of them even liked the song before watching the video, but the more they heard about Thicke’s comments on the video and the video itself there seemed to be a turning of opinion.

There is a great moment where one of the teens even says that if we just shrug off what is happening in the song and in the video than nothing will change. It was kind of amazing to see this from a bunch of teens when there are some adults who do not understand that concept (just look at almost any comment section dealing with criticism of a specific media). So I highly recommend watching the video above and let me know what you think about the teens reactions.