Tag Archives: Mad Max: Fury Road

Forever better than the Oscars… the MTV Movie Awards

I mean, I didn’t even watch them, just saw that they had happened because my social media started popping up with movie trailers that aired during it. But especially after such a disappointing and controversial Oscars this year, I had to run off and see what had won!

Link to that here.

Very nice! Deadpool, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Mad Max Fury Road… there’s some good stuff there. Nicely done, MTV Movie Awards. To be fair, Deadpool would be an option for next year’s Oscars, so we’ll see how that goes…

But the categories, the movies, the everything, better. Maybe it’s time to replace the one with the other…

Sorry there’s not more to this post than that, but! Have a few trailers after the jump!

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Holly’s Best of 2015

Obviously this is continuing in the grand tradition of end of year best of overviews. David did his yesterday and pointed out correctly that this year has not been quite as productive as last year. Although this year has also been a big year because the arrival of Geek Baby made this an exciting and interesting year. When we did have time this year we were able to consume a few things and so with that in mind here are my “Best of 2015”. Continue reading

Have we mentioned Honest Trailers?

We love us some movies, and we love us some movie commentary. Blogs like We Minored in Film, or YouTube channels like How It Should Have Ended or CinemaSins. Well, somewhere in there we found another: Honest Trailers, by Screen Junkies.

Their most recent is Mad Max: Fury Road, which was pretty spectacular. Basically agreeing with me: if you’re going to make an action movie, make one like Fury Road!

A couple more recent ones we liked below the fold!

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Mad Max Fury Road: Feminism and Movie Review

Yesterday Holly reviewed one of the things that stood out most starkly and surprised us most when we got to (finally) watch Mad Max: Fury Road. That is, the post-apocalyptic religion. I guess that kind of leaves me to do a review of “everything else,” but there’s one main thing I want to talk about.

For one thing, and as I’ve said before, this was a movie we were really excited for, and were sad that we missed in theaters. We were literally in the hospital when it came out: it just wasn’t in the cards for us. In the cars?… Anyway, when we heard it was out digitally, we jumped, set aside time, even had people over.

And we always knew we were going to like it because, if nothing else, Borderlands. Neither of us have actually seen any of the original Mad Max movies, but we know that a large part of the aesthetic of the Borderlands video games is based on these movies. And then we saw the trailer, and we could see it: we could see Borderlands, and it was glorious in its ridiculous. I could be heard saying “if you’re going to make an action movie, make a movie like that.”

So let me first talk about what few expectations we had going into the movie, then discuss the number one thing we heard once the movie came out: feminism. This somehow managed to pique our already high interest even more… So join me for the review, then head off to buy yourself a digital copy of Mad Max: Fury Road!

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Mad Max: Fury Road & Religion

Worship at the altar of steering wheels.

Worship at the altar of steering wheels.

David and I finally got to watch Mad Max: Fury Road because it came out for digital purchase last week and we knew we wanted to own it. As many others did, we both loved the movie and are super excited to watch it again.

One of the things that I personally found fascinating about the movie was the religious elements that were presented. In a post-apocalyptic society it makes sense that the standard religions and organizations would have dissolved or melded into something new. This is very much the case with the War Boys of Immortan Joe and can be seen in a variety ways throughout the movie. The other piece is that the language and act of worship by the War Boys makes complete sense for the time and place and shows an example of how religion can change based on the society’s circumstances. In this society where resources are scarce and people are dying they are simply looking for hope of something better.

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