Tag Archives: Fox

Audio

Week in Geek S.2 E.1

Week in Geek, season 2 episode 1, recorded 1/28/18. News since last season, including: Tarantino R-rated Star Trek; DC and Justice League and the uncertain future of their films; Star Wars and the absence of news about Solo; and a lot on Marvel, Disney, and the Fox purchase.

Our other podcast is Comparative Opinions, find it and old Week in Geek episodes on ComparativeGeeks.com. Subscribe for new episodes!

Music is by Scott Gratton: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Gratton/Intros_and_Outros

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Week in Geek Episode 12

Week in Geek, episode 12, recorded 11/8/17. News since last recording, including: Amazon developing a Lord of the Rings show; Fox news including renewing The Orville and A Christmas Story Live; Disney news including their fight with the Los Angeles Times, their potential purchase of parts of Fox, what this means for their streaming service, casting for The Lion King, and the MCU passing $5 billion domestic ticket sales; DC news including Wonder Woman now being the highest grossing origin story, Justice League’s 2-hour cap, and the poaching of Brian Michael Bendis on the comics side; and the mixed reception for Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express. We’ll be back with more Week in Geek in January!

Here’s a link to that LA Times article about Disney and Anaheim: http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-fi-disney-anaheim-deals/

Our other podcast is Comparative Opinions, find it and old Week in Geek episodes on ComparativeGeeks.com. Subscribe for new episodes!

Music is by Scott Gratton: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Gratton/Intros_and_Outros

Verdict: Ghosted

Last night we finally made it through the second episode of the new show Ghosted. The premise in and of itself sounds interesting, although a little bit Men In Black meets The X-Files.  You have the conspiracy theorist / genius who has been deemed a crazy fraud and a former cop who left the force and hit rock bottom. They get thrown together into a crazy world of paranormal activity.

The thought seems good that there is the cynic cop who is just looking at the logic of the situation and then the former professor who understands the potential science behind the paranormal. So it is the contrasting personalities playing off of each other that would make the show work. The problem is that the connection between the two main characters so far is just not there and everything is happening in such a whirlwind where we are meant to have a connection with what is happening and it is missing.

Too Fast

So part of the inherent problem of the show might be that the episodes are only 20 minutes long instead of the typical 45 minutes. With only 20 minutes to try and explain an entire underground government agency – plus introduce our two main characters – the pilot episode just came across as kind of frantic and it was hard to really get a grasp on anything that was happening. Now understanding that it was the pilot episode I was willing to give it the benefit of the doubt, which is why we watched the second episode.

The second episode was better, but still lacked. It seemed to jump ahead to days or weeks later and they had a mission together, instead of taking us to right after the first episode like we might expect. There was no real explanation of what they faced or how it worked. Everything just sort of happened and throughout the whole episode there was no connection between the two main characters, which is vital for a show like this.

Lack of Chemistry

The other big issue is definitely the lack of chemistry between the characters. They are there on screen and going through the motions, but nothing seems to be sticking. There are definitely some funny moments and it might get better; at the same time I just don’t think there is enough there. I like that it is a female who leads the organization and a woman is the one who does the weapons, but still there needs to be something to connect with and there is not.

The second episode is almost like walking in mid-way through a season where we are supposed to have seen how they have gotten to this point. Instead the show has just jumped ahead to a point and we are supposed to be along for the ride.

Verdict

Some of it if we didn’t already have a lot of great shows that we are watching I might be willing to give this show more chances, but as it stands I think this is a pass for us. It is not terrible, but it definitely does not hold my interest enough to spend time to keep watching it. Let us know if it gets better if you keep watching Ghosted!

No More Fantastic Four?

I came across this news story via a Twitter Moment, the phrase “Fantastic Four writer” instantly triggering the thought of Jonathan Hickman – and being right, in this case!

Since as I’ve said I’ve pretty much stopped reading or keeping up with Marvel comics since the end of Secret Wars, I was surprised to find out that one of the comics that has not come back since then is Fantastic Four. The characters just aren’t there, there’s no title, all that. At this point, it’s been nearly 2 years. Thus the question – where are the Fantastic Four?

There’s been whirling theories about Marvel, their comics, and their movie rights. It’s been going on for a while – here’s a link to an article I wrote about that in 2014. If you look at the comics and merchandizing and things lately – or things like Guardians of the Galaxy getting a theme park ride at Disneyland – the focus has been on the Marvel Studios films. When properties like Spider-Man and the X-Men and all feel like they used to be the premier Marvel characters, and now all of a sudden we all know who the Guardians of the Galaxy are… something is happening.

I’ve pretty much argued before that what’s going on here is mainly business decisions. The interview with Hickman makes this seem the same – business business business. But he points out that we’re seeing something different between, say, the X-Men and the Fantastic Four. It’s not just that Marvel lacks the rights to both and is keeping them down – it’s that Fox (which has the movie rights to both teams) hasn’t made a good Fantastic Four movie yet.

Fair enough. For another example, Marvel has been all over Deadpool related stuff, and they don’t have those film rights – and you take a character like Gwenpool and you’ve got a Spider-Man/Deadpool crossover character that nonetheless is getting attention from Marvel, despite the doubly complicated movie rights involved there.

No Fantastic Four because no good movie makes some sense. Again, you could come up with conspiracies – for instance, the thought that you don’t want to produce new ideas for Fox to try to run with in making yet another reboot. However, if they want to try to do another film, I would recommend going with an already established Fantastic Four – skip the origin story – and just do a story like “Solve Everything,” Hickman’s first storyline from his writing run. Have the kids in it. Have travel and exploration and science. You could do something different from standard superhero fare.

Which is also something of the point when it comes to the storytelling side of there being no Fantastic Four comic: what story do you tell with them?

Secret Wars ends with the Fantastic Four (and the kids and all) in an interesting place. They are in some ways the least affected by the events that ended the Marvel Universe; in other ways, they are the most burdened by it. The basic assumption at this point is that they are super busy doing interesting and important things. Honestly, the longer they keep them off the page, the more work they’re going to have to put into figuring out what cool or interesting thing they have been doing with their time.

Really, they’re ripe for imagination work, for interesting ideas and new things. They always have been. There’s a reason I think that they worked so well at the core of Hickman’s storyline. Reed at points functions as the voice of the author, explaining the problem and plot to us in no uncertain terms.

I argued before that the problem they seemed to be running into with the X-Men, more than anything, was that they were dealing with a fundamental societal problem without easy solutions, and if you do actually resolve it, you’re largely done – or at least, they’re no different from other superheroes. If mutants get equal rights, if they end up living in harmony with humans, you’re just done. However, if you show that no progress has ever been made and it’s all been for nothing, well, that’s kind of a stalemate as well.

The Marvel Universe reboot theoretically let them reset that whole tension, but it’s still there. It’s just quite simply harder to write X-Men stories as time goes on. However, it should be easier to write the Fantastic Four – you just need big ideas. You need vision. Or maybe, anthology style, a bunch of smaller or shorter ideas. And maybe they’re lacking that right now, and waiting on it. Maybe they have that, and are waiting for the right time – for a big crossover event or something.

Or maybe, maybe they’re just waiting for a good Fantastic Four movie. Or for the rights to revert back to them. I don’t know, but it’s interesting to get Hickman’s perspective on it!

New TV Channel Apps

It is interesting that for a time Hulu was the only place that we could watch our TV shows online. We had originally started paying for Hulu because we could get previous TV shows and paid a cheaper price with a student discount. But we recently dropped Hulu

I remember talking about how I wish with cable companies you could pick and choose what channels you were going to watch, but that was not an option. Now even though the cable company is still trapped in the typical bundling model we are actually getting more choices with show applications for our devices. This allows us as consumers to choose what we want to consume and from whom. Now some are still making users be tied to a cable subscription, but it feels like it is only time until even they offer a pay-to-watch model or just give other options.

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