Tag Archives: Douglas Adams

Z is for Zaphod Beeblebrox

ZZaphod Beeblebrox. Now that is one hoopy frood. Of Douglas Adams’ crazy creations in the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Zaphod works out as one of the more normal and acceptable. He is the self-involved politician, who holds no real power but is just a figurehead. Is he a parody of all politicians? A metaphor? Is he just the perfect politician – able to draw attention away from those with real power? 

Who knows, but for some reason, this over-the-top character with two heads and three arms is an acceptable part of the universe. And he puts his position and situation to good use, stealing the Heart of Gold and allowing Adams to do literally whatever he wanted with these stories – thanks to the Infinite Improbability Drive. Ah, the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. If you haven’t read it, I do recommend it, and the second book, in particular. And if you like those, the whole series. But for now, a couple of great parts about Zaphod Beeblebrox!

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Martin Freeman is the English Everyman

Martin Freeman as Bilbo BagginsMartin Freeman is an actor who’s been getting increasingly more airtime and shows, it seems. Or bigger name ones, going more international. Something. He keeps showing up in these English films, anyway.

And he has a typecast, like so many actors end up in. But Martin Freeman’s is fascinating – his is as the everyman. A common enough idea in storytelling, for sure, and many stories have one. But a really defined everyman? One whose sole purpose is to be the everyman, where their life is so ordinary that it’s absurd anything story-worthy is happening to them. This seems particularly like a British storytelling trait, these uber-everymen.

And of these, why does it seem like Martin Freeman is working his way through playing all of them on screen? That feels like more than a typecast to me. Consider the main examples with me below! And then just consider the question… is Martin Freeman THE English Everyman?

All photos found on http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0293509/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1 Continue reading

The Timeline of River Song

So, a project Holly and I would like to undergo is to explore River Song on Doctor Who in her subjective order, rather than in any sort of chronological, or episode-order, or Doctor-order sort of way. Having watched all of the New Who, this shouldn’t be a problem, right?

The problem with Time Travel is one that is defined by many. Douglas Adams sees it as one of grammar. However, for the Doctor and River Song, the problem of two Time Travelers, at least, is that you keep meeting in the wrong order.

So we plan on starting this marathon tonight, and I have been researching a recommended order, and thought I would talk about this just a bit. If you’re looking for a Timeline of River Song, I will have that linked below! Continue reading

Science Fiction and Religion – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

I initially started writing about Science Fiction as it relates to Religion in terms of aliens – and how the existence of aliens might do a lot to prove or disprove religions. There are a lot more science fiction worlds I could look at and discuss this point, and I may at some point in the future. However, a truly intelligent alien race, that was around well before us, is an entirely different train of thought.

And that leads me to today’s topic: Intelligent Design. A common theme in science fiction, the creation of humanity as the result of alien influence. Seen prominently recently in Prometheus, this thought comes up a lot, and while it doesn’t prove anything – the fiction aspect of the phrase – it does pose some hard scientific questions.

The Ultimate Hitchhiker's GuideSo let’s go with the best example of this: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.

Why have a stuffy intellectual conversation or a self-righteous religious one when we can have a fun conversation? If you haven’t read the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, go do it. If you prefer audio books, Holly loved listening to it with Stephen Fry narrating. It is a good time, a fantastic parody, but with some solid thought that went into it too, which is a lot of its lasting appeal. So let’s take a look at what Douglas Adams did with Religion.
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Science Fiction Today – The Environment and Scarcity

Welcome back for another round of Science Fiction Today. Last time, I considered what thinking about things like the sequester would be like a bit further into our future. Hey look, that ended up happening… Oh, and in terms of virtual vacations, I was reminded that this is also somewhat the plot to (either) Total Recall.

For today, I wanted to tackle another sticky situation, one where I feel like we seem to be missing the point as we argue politically.

That would be the environment. What will that look like in the future? Continue reading