Tag Archives: cultural differences

Comics to Read – Persepolis

Today is a re-blog. David and I both have a post running today on other blogs. This is the comics post I wrote and ran over on Sourcerer – and you can find David’s Passionate Geeks post over on Eclectic Alli: https://eclecticali.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/passionate-geeks-i-cant-stop-thinking-big-the-music-of-rush/ Hope you enjoy!

Sourcerer

Cover of Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi Cover of Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

Persepolis is an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi. She grew up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. When things seemed to get to rough she got sent away to Europe, but eventually came back home. It was also one of the top challenged books in America in 2014.

Using a graphic novel to tell the story made it something that could cross boundaries in many ways. It is difficult to talk about a situation from another culture if you have not grown up in that situation. Visuals help to translate those cultural differences into something that can be interpreted by others. The story itself is so incredible and to see those items visually it really brings power to the story being told.

A graphic novel granted Marjane Satrapi the ability to put a face on the situation in Iran, where otherwise it…

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Americanization of Foreign Media

David Tennant as Alec Hardy in Broadchurch from http://tennantnews.blogspot.com

David Tennant as Alec Hardy in Broadchurch from http://tennantnews.blogspot.com

Recently I found out that David Tennant will be in the American version of Broadchurch called Gracepoint apparently reprising the same character, although under a different name. Now when I originally heard they were going to do an American version of Broadchurch I was not particularly surprised. There seems to be a history of us thinking the story will work in America, but we do not just want to take the story as is and instead wanting to relate it more to the American experience, I guess. When I heard that David Tennant was reprising his role in the American version it just made the whole thing seem kind of pointless. Broadchurch was such a good show and so well done. The humanity of the story is understandable even if you are not British. They technically did show Broadchurch on BBC America already, but I wonder about other channels getting the rights to showing foreign shows. I do wonder if it is part of the fact that we feel need to “Americanize” the foreign media.

This show is not the first time that we have seen a foreign media changed to an American version of the same story. It is the fact that it is using the same actor that just seems to make it even more ridiculous. I love David Tennant as much as the next, but why do we have to make something new if the original still works. Continue reading

Cultural and Generational Differences

Sorry this is a little late yesterday just got away from me. David and I went and saw the local high schools production of Spamalot last night and there were a couple of interesting changes that they made to the story and music. One of the main things was that they changed the song “You Won’t Succeed on Broadway” to say “if you don’t have any stars” instead of “if you don’t have any jews”. The change could have been for a couple of reasons, one is that it could be seen as racial insensitive or a racial stereotype. The other reason is that the high schoolers putting on the production may not actually understand the meaning behind saying jews and stars makes more sense.

We had a similar experience when we saw the West End production of Avenue Q in London. During the song “It Sucks to Be Me” there is one line where a character laments that “I work in a Korean Deli, but I am Japanese”, but in the West End version they said Chinese Restaurant instead of Korean Deli. It makes sense to change that line if people will not understand what a Korean Deli is. Both of these show where cultural and generational differences can change the meaning behind a statement and might make us want to change how a specific piece of information is presented. Continue reading