Tag Archives: comic review

Thoughts on Seconds

Seconds CoverSo, yesterday I started and finished reading Seconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley. First off I highly recommend it if you have not read it because it is so good. I love Katie as a character and think that they use a very creative premise to essentially show what it means to grow up.

The basic idea is basically that Katie discovers a way to have a do-over on moments in her life. She keeps getting second chances on what happened, but as she moves further back through her life things begin to get a little strange. One of the big ideas presented in this is trying to make your life perfect, but what does that really mean or even look like? Also, if you could create a perfect life would you even recognize who you are in that new world if the moments that define who you are had not happened? (Spoilers for Seconds after the jump.)

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Guest Post: Friendship to the Max! Lumberjanes

Via Boom Studios

Via Boom Studios

Guest post by Leah, who writes at  The Lobster Dance, a blog about gender and media (and often Japan) and I’ll Make It Myself!a food blog about gender, geekery, and sometimes cannibal jokes. Find her work on Comparative Geeks here.

Lumberjanes

Created by Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis & Noelle Stevenson. Illustrated by Brooke Allen (vol. 1-8) & Carolyn Nowak (vol. 11-). Colors by Maarta Laiho. Letters by Aubrey Aliese.

This review has one mild spoiler, but if you’re like me, it’ll make you want to read the series more!

You’re in a quiet theater, watching the previews for the latest action ensemble movie. Out of the silence you hear it–

But what if they were all women?

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Amulet – All Caught Up

So after Holly and I started reading Amulet, Holly wrote an initial review. When we were about halfway through reading, I got to chance to see the author, Kazu Kibuishi, presenting live about his process. Now that I have read through Volume 6, and am now officially all caught up with all there is thus far, I thought I would add a bit to the discussion.

I don’t want to add too many details because, like Holly, I don’t want to spoil you – I want you to read these. They’re great. And knowing more now as I do, I think they’re even better – as they were developed entirely as Graphic Novels, as a form – not printed as comics and then bound together. I had mentioned in my previous post that I had more I could write about that, and about Kazu’s process – so I’ll talk about that!

Then I’ll just talk about a few of my favorite aspects, and things that I think might interest you more in the story, to get you reading too! I have found Amulet on ComiXology, so I know that is a reading option. It’s also wildly popular with younger readers right now, and published by Scholastic who know how to get kids and adults reading the same thing! As such, you should definitely be able to find this at the library, at least in the US! (Sorry Japan, you might not have this one.) Alright, let’s take a look at Amulet!

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Why Fans Love Ms. Marvel

Ms. Marvel #1 has recently entered its seventh printing. Seventh! That’s practically unheard of in comics, especially for a total newcomer like Kamala Khan. As Marvel.com puts it: “Marvel Comics presents the all-new MS. MARVEL, the ground breaking heroine that has become an international sensation! Kamala Khan is just an ordinary girl from Jersey City–until she is suddenly empowered with extraordinary gifts. But who truly is the all-new Ms. Marvel? Teenager? Muslim? Inhuman? Find out as she takes the Marvel Universe by storm, and prepare for an epic tale that will be remembered by generations to come. History in the making is NOW!”

Hyperbolic, perhaps… but seventh printing. Meanwhile, the series is still going strong at nine issues and a collected first volume. The critics, including me in my monthly reviews, are about as excited as Marvel seems to be. Why do we love Kamala? Well, it would be a mistake to discount her minority status as a Pakistani-American Muslim. She provides a brand-new, yet long-awaited perspective on superhero comics. It would also be a mistake to reduce her to token status, though — there’s so much more to this comic and this character. The story, provided by G. Willow Wilson, turns a typical superhero origin story into something affecting and delightful. The art, usually provided by Adrian Alphona, is fabulous and full of sight gags. Kamala herself is funny, endearing, and brave.

All this is true, but there’s one more element that tends to get glanced over in reviews — Kamala is a geek like us, and I’ve got pictures to prove it!

Pics are screencapped from the comics, links go to my blog for more detail about particular issues and events. Spoilers! Continue reading

Batman: Year One: Review and thoughts on Gotham

Batman Year One CoverFrank Miller did a lot to build up Batman with his comics in the 80s. Gene’O of Sourcerer wrote a twopart review of The Dark Knight Returns last month. It sounded great, and I requested it from the library. But it was checked out, and I got Batman: Year One first. Well, that’s good too, right?

It sounds like Frank Miller wrote this comic after his Dark Knight comics. Because while Batman had a known origin story, which was good and which worked, there was still room to go back to the early days. To go back to the beginning. So that’s what this comic does: Bruce Wayne has just returned from his 12 years abroad, and Gordon has just moved to Gotham as well. The comic follows not only the origin of Batman, but the origin of Gordon as well.

And really, it’s Gordon’s story that I found much more compelling in this. Batman becomes Batman! Who knew? Everybody knows. But what Gordon had to go through? A good cop in a bad town? That’s a story. So that leaves me excited for the new show this fall, Gotham, which won’t star Batman, but instead the cops, the early Gordon. So I’ll close with that!

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