Tag Archives: Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Hail Hydra? The New Captain America?

So I should open by saying I haven’t read the comic yet. And it’s an issue number 1, so nobody has that much insight into it. But in this week’s newest All New, All Different Marvel Universe title – Steve Rogers: Captain America #1 – we got to see a shocking twist on a 75 year old beloved character!

Kilgrave Hail Hydra

That’s right, Memes-away, it’s Hydra time! This was one of the most interesting things about Captain America: Winter Soldier, I think especially on a first viewing. The role of Hydra in the MCU is massive! It’s crazy! It sprouted a cool meme, it breathed life into Agents of SHIELD (honestly, they’ve been riding that train ever since), it was great. It had shock value, but didn’t change the meaning too much on what had come before – rather, it provided a whole bunch of context.

So let me talk it through, in terms of how it differs from its use in the movies, and then in terms of how it totally makes sense because of the movies.

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Science Fiction Today – Justice System

JThe justice system is a complicated process and deals with not only finding the people who commit crimes, but also convicting and judging them. There are a lot of different areas that make up the entire justice system and in science fiction we see these areas dealt with in very different ways.

In some stories it is about compressing the process, in that way justice can happen more swiftly and not have to deal with the lengthy processes of trials or other things. Another option that can be found in science fiction is creating some sort of automated or surveillance-based system. The basic idea is that someone is always watching and keeping track. Both of these futures look to hasten the path to justice, but at a cost.

Cop, Judge, Jury

Karl Urban as Dredd in DreddThe obvious reference for a science fiction justice system are things such as Judge Dredd or Robocop. In these situations someone or something finds the criminals, decides their guilt, and passes the sentence. A lot of time this occurs because crime has risen to such a level that justice needs to happen swiftly in order to deal with the growing number of criminals that are out in society. This means that a person is trained to do every step of the process instead of having one person to arrest and investigate, another to decide to go to trial, and then a judge to pass sentencing. It narrows the process down to one person to speed up the process.

Automated Justice

In a few science fiction stories they look at justice as the need to watch things at all times. This can be seen in Minority Report (in a way) and in the surveillance system set up in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Now each of these stories add an additional level of judging a crime or criminal before it happens and basically convicting before a crime happens. At the same time the idea is still their that surveillance is used as the ultimate justice system.

The idea that we can track citizens at every moment could mean that we could track the actions and give tickets and sentencing based on those actions. Now imagine that it is not external surveillance, but something that gets imbedded underneath the skin of each individual. Something that could track you and automatically send a signal to the police or automatically take fines out of your bank account, points off your license, etc. Something like in Fifth Element when his car was deducting points from his license as he drove.

Obviously the extreme problem with all of this is can either of these solutions really be called justice? Both of them are quick to convict and not take the time to fully examine or look at a situation. It is about the swiftness of justice instead of the ethics or morals of justice. What do you think?

This post is part of the April A to Z Challenge, and also part of our occasional series on Science Fiction Today. You can read an explanation of both here. We are striving to keep these posts short, and know that we have not covered every example or angle – plenty of room for discussion!

Verdict: Agent Carter

Last week the new ABC show Agent Carter premiered, the latest in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It stars Hayley Atwell, who has been slowly increasing in how often she has been showing up in the movies and shows. She plays Agent Peggy Carter, first seen in Captain America: The First Avenger, a character who has been increased from her comic origins to be a total World War 2 era badass.

I wrote a post on Sourcerer about my misgivings about the show – and then initial reactions – last week. If it isn’t obvious, we were excited for this show and have been thinking about it a while. But I was worried – really worried – that it was going to not be able to pull it off. It’s doing something that no other TV show has done before, as a pre-sequel show where we know everything that eventually happens.

So will we keep watching it? Did they disappoint or succeed?  Continue reading

Best and Worst Comics LitFlix 2014

We did this last year, and it was a lot of fun. What were the best and worst movie adaptations from existing source material? What we have to work from are our LitFlix, the movies we see after reading the source material. I’ll be writing about the comics adaptations of the year today, and Holly will cover the books tomorrow.

We’ve fallen behind some this fall, so the list of what we have to go from is smaller than the overall list of movie adaptations. I think the biggest deal is that we didn’t see Gone Girl, which people seems to have loved. Oh, and we haven’t seen Battle of the Five Armies yet, but expect that in the coming weeks…

Comics-wise, we are pretty good. And what a year for comics! Four big-name Marvel movies, some great independent comic adaptations, and a number of ones that may not be quite as good… which we may not have seen! So let me lay out my favorites both as a movie, and as an adaptation!

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Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Great? Or Overrated?

We saw something interesting today. Specifically, this:

Sorry America, we did not love this movie like most of you did. On an unrelated note, we also found TONS of sins in this movie; way more than you were probably expecting.

That’s from the new CinemaSins for Captain America: The Winter Soldier. In 20 minutes, they rip into the film. Or, well, try. Do you think they did a good job?

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