Tag Archives: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

We May Have to Watch More of This… Sesame Street

So we have started occasionally showing the Geek Baby some videos and such online – like Winnie the Pooh per our poll – and then we remembered that HBO bought Sesame Street, and that means we have access to it there.

We’ve watched a bit of classic Sesame Street, and the Geek Baby can’t really sit through a whole episode, so she wanders off a bit into it but it’s fun. Holly and I both certainly get some nostalgia from it.

And then today we put on the most recent episode, last weekend’s Music Magic. And who cares what the Geek Baby thought… we were awestruck.

This fairy, in fact.

This fairy, in fact.

First, the long opening segment was about Elmo being left the new fairy character’s magic wand. He casts a spell, and suddenly everyone around him is singing whatever they say. And they can’t stop singing whatever they say. Holly and I could not stop thinking – and it seemed rightly so – of the Buffy episode “Once More with Feeling,” the musical episode.

Good times. And then the episode went on, you know, songs and letters and numbers. These things. Anyway, it continues on to a segment about listening carefully. With Cookie Monster.

At Hogwarts.

“Furry Potter and the Goblet of Cookies,” to be precise, and there’s a muppet of Dumbledore there too with a funny name and it was amazing. There were cute house banners in the background, Cookie Monster doing magic, it was just…

When did Sesame Street become so geeky? I don’t know, but I like it. I think this watching kids’ shows thing might work out for us…

Science Fiction and Religion – The Apocalypse

Is there just an apocalypse waiting?

From Avengers #3 by Jonathan Hickman.

I love Hickman’s Avengers. I’ve written about that fact before, and especially one of the things I love about his Marvel work – and his other comics – is how he works with both science and mythology. In Avengers, especially, he works on larger, over-arching mythology for the whole Marvel Universe. Its origins… and its ending.

That ending was last summer’s big crossover event, Secret Wars. I reviewed that recently. But it was a lot of time and comics leading into it, not just one crossover and everything is over. The apocalypse did not happen suddenly, although it may have felt that way if you were reading other titles… or just reading about the whole thing in the press about it.

No, in reading the whole thing, the buildup and then the collapse, I got to thinking of two things. One is the obvious, I suppose: other apocalyptic literature. Religious especially, the sort that seeps out into shows like Supernatural or Buffy the Vampire Slayer. We were reading a lot of the book of Daniel recently at church, and it’s also just chock full of apocalyptic dreams and visions. So the end of the world: symbolism, signs, and things that are either super literal or completely metaphorical…

The second thing I was thinking of, however, was the Final Fantasy XIII series, wherein the world ends between Final Fantasy XIII-2 and Lightning Returns. In particular, at the end of XIII-2, time itself ends, and the power of death along with it… but as Mr. Fantastic might say, everything dies, and ever so slowly that world does too.

Taken all together, you get what I considered as the alternate title to this blog post: how to end the universe.

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Favorite Truth Altering Moments

Leo DiCaprio wins an Oscar...

Recently I have been thinking a lot about what it means to say something is true, which is a story for another time. In thinking about the idea of truth it made me think about the movies I have seen or stories that I have read where in the end truth seems to be a flexible idea. So here for your consideration are some of my favorite truth altering stories. Continue reading

Consuming Comics – Geek 501

Oh no, we might have gone a little overboard at the library... #comics #somanycomics

A post shared by @comparative_geeks on

After checking out a whole bunch of comics and graphic novels from our local library it got me thinking of all the forms that comics take. There is the comic strip in the newspaper that so many of us grew up reading. Now we have online web comics that for many of us have probably replaced reading any newspaper comics. Then there are the serial comics that come out monthly with longer stories that can happen over years. These are the typical superhero comics, such as Batman and X-Men. They might be released on a regular schedule, but then the stories will get compiled into a trade paperback. On top of that there are graphic novels that are single releases of a story. Often times they are fictional, but they have also been used for memoir or other non-fictional stories. This has even gone so far as to be used to help explain concepts such as copyright and media consumption.

Using drawings to help tell a story means that the visuals of the story can be shown through the pictures instead of explained and interpreted. The interesting thing is that even though all the elements are the same there seems to be a class difference between the various comic types. Graphic novels definitely seemed to be treated as a higher form than the regular weekly / daily comics. Even though there is an art to being able to get out so much content every week. Continue reading

Favorite Doctor Who? Blink, Moffat, and graphs! Part 1

It’s that time again: we have Doctor Who on the brain. The new season starts in a couple of weeks, and that got me thinking back to a recent article on the Mary Sue about one of our favorite episodes, Blink. And about how Steven Moffat doesn’t know why it’s such a fan favorite episode.

So I want to approach this from a couple angles. This week is about Blink and why it stands out as a favorite. And I have graphs! It goes to the heart of selecting a favorite episode of a TV show in general.

The second angle is about the Mary Sue’s question about Moffat being able to repeat said success now that he’s showrunner. As Holly wrote a while back, once we started paying attention to the showrunner and writing credits – and saw which episodes Moffat had written – we knew exactly why he was the new showrunner. And I do see him repeating himself, trying to perfect some of his concepts – so that’ll be some deeper Doctor Who exploration next time!
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