Tag Archives: Bruce Wayne

Movie Reaction – The Lego Batman Movie

We saw the Lego Batman Movie a couple weeks ago, and I’m not quite sure what to say about it. It was good. We enjoyed it.

It ends up as a pretty good answer to the question of “what is it like in the realm of one of the master builders?” Because that’s how you make a stand-alone movie that’s also a sequel to the Lego Movie. Batman makes for a good hero, since he was a hilarious secondary character in the original.

It also ends up a pretty good movie for exploring the question of, “who is Batman? And who is Batman in relation to others?” What Batman needs is a family. What he has no idea how to deal with is a family. This movie explores that pretty well, with the young ward, with Batgirl and the relationship with the police, and even exploring the relationship with Alfred.

All-in-all, it seems like not much to say. If you’re a Batman fan, check out the movie. If you’re a Lego Movie fan, check out the movie. But all of that also seems pretty obvious. It was good. It didn’t blow me away like the Lego Movie did, but that was probably impossible.

And then, the review circuit gave me something to talk about.

Gay Adoption Undercurrents? Really?

There’s a review that said that a simple running joke in the movie was in fact an insidious hidden political agenda. The joke is simple: when Batman is confronted by Robin about how his adopted father, Bruce Wayne, should be consulted before he runs off to be a superhero… Batman lies. Rather than reveal his secret identity, he claims that he adopted Robin along with Bruce Wayne.

It is mentioned a few times, so it becomes a running joke. There’s not really any discussion of what relationship Bruce Wayne and Batman have – just that Robin has two fathers.

In my opinion, the joke is that Batman tells an obvious lie and Robin buys it hook, line, and sinker. The joke is that he doesn’t get it. And the joke relies on the audience knowing full well what the truth is – so the audience knows, completely, that it’s not true. So any young people who might get brainwashed by any subliminal messaging there… they know it’s a lie.

But still, there’s that thought that – because no one corrects Robin of his belief in his two fathers – it’s normalizing the idea of having two fathers. But the joke relies on the absurdity of that claim – so does it actually normalize anything?

Or is it just a joke playing on the blind trust of Robin, the naivety, and the cold Batman who won’t let anyone in?

I’d love to know what you think, about this or about the movie in general!

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Comparative Opinions: Hush

Yesterday Holly gave her review of Batman: Hush, which is one of those comics from the canon of Batman. I’ve been working my way through various Batman comics, in a not-particularly-chronological fashion, but Holly’s only read a couple along the way. So her review was more about the comic itself, about what it was all on its own. Great review, and I’m going to try to not repeat what she wrote, and to still say something new!

As such, I’ll be looking at the story especially in comparison to another Jeph Loeb-written Batman story: The Long Halloween. On the surface, the two are very similar, so I’ll look at that. However, there are also some strong differences, so I’ll round out by looking at those. Then some final thoughts around stuff that Holly didn’t say, such as it is and as won’t be too spoilery, and thoughts on what I’ll be reading next from Batman!

For my first thoughts though, how about the art? It’s really something in this comic. As commenters have pointed out on Holly’s post, the art is by Jim Lee, and is top notch. Every once in a while the comic just stops for a nice big two-page scene, and it’s just a lot of fun to read from that perspective as well. I’ve really enjoyed Loeb’s story’s, but the art in this one stood out a lot as well, meaning it really is the whole package.

What's better than having a Batcave? Having a Batcave full of Batmobiles!

What’s better than having a Batcave? Having a Batcave full of Batmobiles!

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First Impression, Gotham

David and I sat down and watched Gotham the other night. I have seen a lot of reviews out and so far the reactions seemed to be mixed. From my perspective I was not quite sure what I was getting into with a prequel to the Batman era so I was definitely open to what they were going to show. Now initial impression is that I enjoyed the first episode and am definitely willing to watch more. I think there were some good and bad things about the setup in the pilot. One thing that I found odd was it felt like they were trying to introduce all of the characters that we would recognize in the first episode, which came across a little off to me in terms of the story. The part that I thought was good is that they started with the murder of Bruce Wayne’s parents, Thomas and Martha. That is such a well known case to start on that it makes sense and then we hopefully get to see the ripple effect from there. Continue reading

Batman: Year One: Review and thoughts on Gotham

Batman Year One CoverFrank Miller did a lot to build up Batman with his comics in the 80s. Gene’O of Sourcerer wrote a twopart review of The Dark Knight Returns last month. It sounded great, and I requested it from the library. But it was checked out, and I got Batman: Year One first. Well, that’s good too, right?

It sounds like Frank Miller wrote this comic after his Dark Knight comics. Because while Batman had a known origin story, which was good and which worked, there was still room to go back to the early days. To go back to the beginning. So that’s what this comic does: Bruce Wayne has just returned from his 12 years abroad, and Gordon has just moved to Gotham as well. The comic follows not only the origin of Batman, but the origin of Gordon as well.

And really, it’s Gordon’s story that I found much more compelling in this. Batman becomes Batman! Who knew? Everybody knows. But what Gordon had to go through? A good cop in a bad town? That’s a story. So that leaves me excited for the new show this fall, Gotham, which won’t star Batman, but instead the cops, the early Gordon. So I’ll close with that!

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The Dark Knight v. The Man of Steel: The Dark Knight Returns, part 2

As I read Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, Clark Kent and Batman are not DKR crimealleylandingexactly friends. They are more like veterans of the same unit who maintain cordial relations. Kent is barely present at all in the first two books, but he definitely looms in the background. We know almost from the beginning that a collision between the two must be inevitable. Kent is the last active superhero. He takes orders directly from the President; and we all know how Batman responds to authorities who try to shut him down.

I’m referring to Superman as Clark Kent throughout this post because I don’t think the name “Superman” appears anywhere in this novel. There’s a suggestion in book three that the word has been censored from the media and just using it is an FCC violation. Miller depicts Superman as a role and Clark Kent at the real identity rather than the disguise. Even the soldiers who work directly with Kent during operations refer to him by his last name. That’s an interesting piece of characterization, because Batman/Bruce Wayne is drawn from the opposite angle. Once he goes back into action, it’s clear that Batman is the true identity, not Wayne.

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